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Sustainable learning brings back the ‘fire’ in instruction

As we have discussed in previous weeks, learning environments that provide voice and choice to students and encourage them to strive for higher-levels of thinking like invention are incredibly beneficial to students – both in terms of their engagement and how long knowledge sticks with them.

Teachers tell us that these sustainable learning strategies have been a game changer for them too, because it allows them to really differentiate learning for each student, allowing them to know and understand students better than ever before.

These strategies fit perfectly with Douglas County School District’s Guaranteed and Viable Curriculum, which provides teachers with the flexibility needed as they change their craft to better meet the needs of students.

 

Watch: These second-year Rock Canyon biotech students are real researchers

Watch: Teachers talk about their experience of changing instructional models

 

 

Watch: Students and teachers talk about learning in the traditional setting versus modernized learning in Douglas County

 

 

Watch: Teachers talk about being able to take risks and try new things

 

 

May 5, 2016 | By CSilberman | Category: World Class Education

District News

High school students across Douglas County, and many students in respective feeder schools, are once again learning that a little kindness can go a long way. Again this year, our high schools hosted Wish Weeks to make dreams come true for Make-A-Wish Foundation beneficiaries.

The Douglas County School District (DCSD) Board of Education has named Thomas S. Tucker, Ph.D. as the sole finalist to lead our 68,000-student district as superintendent on a unanimous vote.
 

 

The American School Counseling Association (ASCA) has certified Sagewood Middle School as a Recognized ASCA National Model Program (RAMP). A prestigious honor, Sagewood is now the only middle school in the state of Colorado to have gained this certification. Schools must receive a near-perfect score on ASCA’s scoring rubric, which outlines guidelines for building and maintaining student achievement, behavior, counseling curriculum, school culture, and several other factors, in order to become certified.