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The 411 on the Allergy Season

CASTLE ROCK - Did you know trees begin spreading pollen before leaves appear on their branches? Grass and weeds will begin pollinating later in the year.

"Most people associate the beginning of allergy season with flowering trees and plants, but the reality is allergy season begins much earlier, when buds on otherwise bare trees begin releasing their pollen." said Christine Cho, MD, assistant professor of pediatrics at National Jewish Health.

Dr. Cho offers advice on steps you can take now to get your child ready for the spring allergy season.

Know exactly what your child is allergic to. See an allergist and have testing done to determine which pollens or other items (molds, pets, etc.) that you are allergic to. Specifically knowing what you are allergic to can help your allergist tailor your treatment plan.

Start taking allergy medications now. Whether your child takes nasal sprays and/or oral medication, have them begin taking their allergy medications now before symptoms start. Beginning those medications now can help lessen the severity of symptoms later.

Stay consistent. Take medications as prescribed. Consistently taking medications will work much better with consistent use rather than used only as urgent relief.

Nasal washes can be very helpful. Many kids with allergic rhinitis, allergic asthma, or other lung problems also have nasal and sinus symptoms. Drainage from their nose and sinuses can make rhinitis and asthma worse, especially at night. A salt water nasal wash, or nasal irrigation, can help reduce this. View the updated nasal wash guidelines.

Monitor pollen counts. Know the pollen counts each day. On high pollen count days keep windows closed to minimize exposure to pollens. If your child has been outdoors a lot, having them bathe before going to bed can go a long way toward helping them, and you, get a good night's sleep.
 


411 on Health Stories are brought to Douglas County School District families through a special partnership with the Rocky Mountain Hospital for Children.

April 2, 2015 | By rmbarber | Category: District, Health Wellness and Prevention, Nursing Services

District News

graduates standing in line outside, smiling

DOUGLAS COUNTY – Graduation rates in the Douglas County School District (DCSD) continue to climb. Data released today by the Colorado Department of Education (CDE) shows the on-time, four-year graduation rate is now 90.4 percent.

DCSD students also made an impressive showing at graduation. The class of 2017 earned more than $82 million in scholarships.

DCSD has one of the highest graduation rates in the Denver metro area. According to CDE, DCSD graduation rates have risen steadily from 81.9 percent in 2009 to 90.4 percent in 2017.

Five female students standing on stage smiling and laughing at the awards ceremony

The top two-percent of female athletes in Douglas County School District (DCSD) were honored at the annual Girls and Women in Sports Luncheon last week at Chaparral High School. This year represented the 30th national celebration of Girls and Women in Sports Day, created to encourage and promote the participation of girls in athletics. The girls who were honored were selected by their school’s coaches, athletic directors and principals for their outstanding achievements.

Superintendent Search text based logo

Working through the recent winter break, the Douglas County School District Board of Education has kicked off its search for DCSD’s next permanent superintendent. Following a thorough vetting of potential search firms, Ray & Associates (no relation to Board Director David Ray) has been hired to conduct the national search. The cost of the firm, excluding travel expenses, is $40,000. The money will come from the school board's budget, which is used for costs such as legal expenses and conferences.