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The 411 on Fevers

Rocky Mountain Hospital for Children

Mild fever is generally easy to treat at home with rest, fluids and over-the-counter medications. However, sometimes fever is an indicator of a more serious infection. See below to help determine whether you need to seek emergency care for yourself or your child. If your child has a fever, it is best to call your pediatrician first before heading to the ER. However, if your pediatrician is unavailable, here are some general guidelines for when to go to the ER.

Newborns and Infants Younger than 3 Months Old

If your baby is less than 3 months old, visit the pediatric ER if his or her temperature is above 100.4 degrees. You should also seek emergency care if your baby’s fever is accompanied by these symptoms:

  • Difficulty waking up to be fed
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Rash
  • Vomiting
  • Inconsolable or non-stop crying

Babies and Toddlers 3 Months to 3 Years

For babies and toddlers between the age of 3 months and 3 years, visit the pediatric ER if the child’s temperature is above 102.2 degrees, or if the child is displaying these symptoms:

  • Difficulty waking up
  • Not urinating
  • Unable to keep fluids down
  • Inconsolable
  • Not up to date on immunizations
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Rash 

Children Age 3 and Older

If your child is 3 or older, visit the pediatric ER if the child’s temperature is over 102 degrees for two or more days. You should also seek emergency care if the fever is accompanied by any of these symptoms:

  • Abdominal pain
  • Difficulty breathing or swallowing
  • Unable to keep fluids down
  • Burning during urination or does not urinate
  • Rash
  • Stiff neck
  • Difficulty waking up
  • Not up to date on immunizations

 
HealthONE has five pediatric emergency departments in the Denver metro area, so you are certain to find an ER that is close to home and able to quickly treat your child. Our hospitals strive to beat the national average wait time, so you can get quick access to high-quality emergency medical care.

November 12, 2014 | By SCPaulsen | Category:

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DCSD is requesting parent input on the health and wellness of our students. Last year, DCSD received a large planning grant from Colorado Health Foundation in an effort to assess how the district supports students through the lens of the Whole School, Whole Community, Whole Child model (WSCC). The mission of this grant is to review the current state of DCSD's student health and wellness program, and then formulate a three to five-year plan based on stakeholders’ needs, the latest research, and best practices. As part of this process, we would like your input.

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It may look like a plain, white shipping container was just parked on the backyard grounds of Mountain Vista High School. The contents of the container are anything but plain, though. Walking inside the container, different colors of ambient lighting glow, futuristic-looking equipment and tall towers are suspended from the ceiling, and the humidity level is set to 70 percent. The container has been recycled into a new kind of learning opportunity for students.