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Create Something Great

If you were fortunate enough to attend the recent Create Something Great meet-up held at the Innovation Pavilion on September 16, then you were part of an elite group of educators privileged to hear Adrian Bazemore from the Procter and Gamble eCommerce Division speak about connecting industry with education.

Mr. Bazemore started out by thanking educators for their willingness to take risks to create something great by creating future leaders.  He stressed the importance of using technology in education, and that educators need to push their students to go that extra mile with technology because technology will set them apart.

Mr. Bazemore advised educators to avoid using technology as a babysitter.  He urged educators to recognize technology as a platform to challenge students to aim higher.  “We have to be the ones to push back the challenge.  Push your students, they can do it!”

Educators attended breakout Learning Sessions that included Google Classrooms, Shifting Learning Environments, Capturing the Learning Using Video, Tech Devices, and Shifting Instructional Practices.

If you are interested in attending Create Something Great meet-ups, please email Linda Conway ljconway[at]dcsdk12[dot]org  or Mary Murphy mary.murphy[at]dcsdk12[dot]org or call 303-387-0600.   Follow us on Twitter #dcsdcsg14.

September 23, 2014 | By lkozel | Category:
October 14, 2014 | By laescobedo | Category:

District News

The Douglas County School District Board of Education welcomes Dr. Thomas S. Tucker into the role of Superintendent of Douglas County School District. Dr. Tucker officially leads the 68,000 student district as of July 1, 2018.

 

Nearly 1,500 Colorado students applied for the prestigious Boettcher Foundation Scholarship this year, with 42 being named recipients. Of those, the Douglas County School District (DCSD) is proudly home to four recipients.

 

When it comes to mental health services, communities traditionally focus on supporting kids as needs arise. This work is crucial for the safety of our students. Equally important, though, is prevention-based programming that can help, early on, prevent the social-emotional challenges our kids may be experiencing from escalating.