Menu
  • Employee Resources
  • Language
    Stay

Measles Outbreak – What You Need to Know

Rocky Mountain Hospital for Children

DOUGLAS COUNTY – An early December outbreak of measles at Disney theme parks in California has so far left 70 people infected with the virus. The illness has since spread to Utah, Washington state, Oregon, Mexico and Colorado. So far there has only been one case in Colorado related to the California outbreak.
 
Measles is a serious respiratory disease that is spread easily through coughing and sneezing. Measles is a very contagious virus that can spread even if the person with measles is no longer in the room. Measles can also be spread by an infected person even before a rash or any other symptoms appear.
 
Measles is spread from person to person through the air by infectious droplets. Severe cases of measles can cause pneumonia, convulsions, brain damage, and death. One to three children out of 1,000 in the U.S. who get measles will die from the disease.

Symptoms of measles

  • Fever – which can become very high
  • Runny nose
  • Cough
  • Feeling run down, achy (also known as malaise)
  • Red, watery eyes (similar to pink eye)
  • A rash that runs from the hairline to the face and neck
  • Tiny white spots with bluish-white centers found inside the mouth (Koplik’s spots)

For more information, visit www.skyridgemedcenter.com.

February 4, 2015 | By SCPaulsen | Category: Communications

District News

The Douglas County School District Board of Education welcomes Dr. Thomas S. Tucker into the role of Superintendent of Douglas County School District. Dr. Tucker officially leads the 68,000 student district as of July 1, 2018.

 

Nearly 1,500 Colorado students applied for the prestigious Boettcher Foundation Scholarship this year, with 42 being named recipients. Of those, the Douglas County School District (DCSD) is proudly home to four recipients.

 

When it comes to mental health services, communities traditionally focus on supporting kids as needs arise. This work is crucial for the safety of our students. Equally important, though, is prevention-based programming that can help, early on, prevent the social-emotional challenges our kids may be experiencing from escalating.