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Kids Come Together to do Great Things: Wish Week Success

ThunderRidge High School Students Celebrate Wish Week

Every year it becomes more obvious how giving students are throughout Douglas County. All nine of the Douglas County high schools identify one week each year to volunteer, fundraise and support the community beyond their own buildings.

Wish Week, as it’s commonly known at many of the schools, is a magical week where anything can happen. Schools are transformed into Disney creations, underwater adventures and even lands filled with superheroes. Not to mention the amazing assemblies where thousands of dollars are raised and then donated to a child struggling with a medical condition.

This year, several schools worked alongside agencies like Make a Wish Foundation and Pennies for Patients to raise money for children going through life changing circumstances.

“Wish week went really well this year. Just seeing everyone’s spirit and enthusiasm during the week was amazing. It’s really great to see everyone come together. It’s my favorite week because all of our feeder schools and communities come together to pull this off,” said Douglas County High School junior, Kaitlyn Magison.

Several high schools even invited their Wish Week kids to spend the day with them, inside the school, attending classes and events and getting to know the entire student body.

“One thing that made a huge difference this year as a school is we got to be part of the wish and got a chance to really know Kenyon. He got to spend an entire day here with us, roaming the halls and having fun. All the students got to see him and give him a high five. It was awesome that we all got to be incorporated with the whole wish,” says Mountain Vista High School Junior, Cameron Hanckock.

Students and their advisors spend months planning Wish Week and all the events and activities that go along with it. This year, schools will have raised more than $300,000 for families and to grant wishes.

“We can change the world. When we come together, high school can be hard, you put your head down, just do your classes, but when you take the time to be a part of something and come together we can do great things,” says Hancock.

While most of the week is filled with costumes, sporting events, competitions, talent shows, assemblies and prizes, these teens are walking away with a bigger gift and lifelong lesson.

“Seeing the impact we made on a family’s life and knowing that we made enough money to fulfill other kids’ wishes. It makes me so proud, not only of our council but our school and our community that everyone came together and provided a family with a gift that no one can ever take away,” says Magison.

It is giving students throughout the school district a chance to change the world, one family at a time.

February 16, 2017 | By acarlson1 | Category: Communications

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