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Author visits Mesa Middle School, leads workshops

CASTLE ROCK- On Friday, December 4, Mesa Middle School hosted author, cartoonist, and graphic novelist, George O'Connor. O'Connor has written and illustrated a number of children's books, but is perhaps currently best known for his 12-book series, The Olympians, which feature the gods of Greek Mythology, as well as stories of the heroes and monsters of the age.

The Mesa Middle School Library hosted three sessions with O'Connor, including a presentation about his writing process, the stories he's already written, and a sneak peak at his next two books, Apollo and Artemis. Students were also given the opportunity to ask him questions on a range of subjects from Greek Mythology to publishing. 

Two more smaller sessions were held in which O'Connor demonstrated basic drawing techniques, tricks that he's learned as an artist, and had students follow along to create their own images of a cyclops, the face of Zeus or Athena, and a full-body image of a Greek god or hero.

Ten students were also selected to have lunch with O'Connor, during which they were able to have even more in-depth conversations.

O'Connor continually remarked how impressed he was with the students at Mesa. "This was one of the most well organized and downright pleasurable author visits I've ever done," he said.

December 9, 2015 | By CSilberman | Category: Middle School Education, Schools

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