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Are your kids addicted to their phones? Join us at a showing of 'Screenagers'

Are you watching kids scroll through life, with their rapid-fire thumbs and a six-second attention span?

Physician and filmmaker Delaney Ruston saw that with her own kids and learned that the average kid spends 6.5 hours a day looking at screens. She wondered about the impact of all this time and about the friction occurring in homes and schools around negotiating screen time—friction she knew all too well. 

In Screenagers, Delaney takes a deeply personal approach as she probes into the vulnerable corners of family life, including her own, to explore struggles over social media, video games, academics and internet addiction. Through poignant, and unexpectedly funny stories, along with surprising insights from authors, psychologists, and brain scientists, Screenagers reveals how tech time impacts kids’ development and offers solutions on how adults can empower kids to best navigate the digital world and find balance.

MORE: Q&A with filmmaker Delaney Ruston

 

New Dates Added!

Watch Screenagers on the following dates and at the following locations:

Wedneday, March 15, Douglas County High School
Monday, March 27, Rock Canyon High School
 
7:00 PM/doors open at 6:30 PM
A moderated discussion will follow each showing.
Tickets: $5
 

 

Learn more about the film at www.screenagersmovie.com

 

January 12, 2017 | By CSilberman | Category:

District News

The Douglas County School District Board of Education welcomes Dr. Thomas S. Tucker into the role of Superintendent of Douglas County School District. Dr. Tucker officially leads the 68,000 student district as of July 1, 2018.

 

Nearly 1,500 Colorado students applied for the prestigious Boettcher Foundation Scholarship this year, with 42 being named recipients. Of those, the Douglas County School District (DCSD) is proudly home to four recipients.

 

When it comes to mental health services, communities traditionally focus on supporting kids as needs arise. This work is crucial for the safety of our students. Equally important, though, is prevention-based programming that can help, early on, prevent the social-emotional challenges our kids may be experiencing from escalating.